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Opening to what is can be one of the most difficult practices in anyone's spiritual practice. We try so hard to control the events that make us feel out of control, and so vulnerable. The harder we try, the further we sink into despair. They say if you ever find yourself stuck in quicksand, you should stop struggling, get on your back and slowly float yourself to shore. That is sound advice for both the unfortunate person who finds themselves in quicksand and the human being stuck in the midst of despair and hopelessness. The hardest part is not struggling! One of the greatest tools human beings have is their ability to split consciousness. In other words, we can view the world within the construct of self, a third party, if you will. This is a wonderful gift, however, we have become so engrossed in the "process of ego" that we have forgotten it is only a "process" a "construct". We settle into a world removed from the actual world around us. This is the quicksand which binds us and leads us into a futile attempt to "think" or "feel" our way out. It seems counterproductive to our situation, however, when struggling, we cant see this. Our head tells us we just need to regain control and it screams so loudly it drowns out the other subtle voice which tell us to "just stop, open up, and let go." When we finally hear this voice, the Buddha, our voice, we relax, float in the vastness of the present. This is usually followed by a great belly laugh at our own expense.
Change if difficult for us all. Through practice we get a little better at recognizing when we are stuck and struggling. We also get better at relaxing, floating to the surface and gently moving back to the shore.
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Opening to what is can be one of the most difficult practices in anyones spiritual practice. We try so hard to control the events that make us feel out of control, and so vulnerable. The harder we try, the further we sink into despair. They say if you ever find yourself stuck in quicksand, you should stop struggling, get on your back and slowly float yourself to shore. That is sound advice for both the unfortunate person who finds themselves in quicksand and the human being stuck in the midst of despair and hopelessness. The hardest part is not struggling! One of the greatest tools human beings have is their ability to split consciousness. In other words, we can view the world within the construct of self, a third party, if you will. This is a wonderful gift, however, we have become so engrossed in the process of ego that we have forgotten it is only a process a construct. We settle into a world removed from the actual world around us. This is the quicksand which binds us and leads us into a futile attempt to think or feel our way out. It seems counterproductive to our situation, however, when struggling, we cant see this. Our head tells us we just need to regain control and it screams so loudly it drowns out the other subtle voice which tell us to just stop, open up, and let go. When we finally hear this voice, the Buddha, our voice, we relax, float in the vastness of the present. This is usually followed by a great belly laugh at our own expense. 
Change if difficult for us all. Through practice we get a little better at recognizing when we are stuck and struggling. We also get better at relaxing, floating to the surface and gently moving back to the shore.

 

Comment on Facebook

Amen my brother

Thank you, thank you 💕

😔😔😔☺️☺️☺️😳😳😳😄😄

Namaste

So true

Bobby Sule

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Emptiness, or Shunyata is a key concept within Buddhism. All is empty, nothing remains, or in AA they say "This too shall pass". You can see and experience shunyata opperating within the world around you. The flowers bloom in spring, the mountain turns green and the forrest comes alive. In winter, the flowers leave no trace, the mountain turns brown, and the forrest goes still. All phenomena are always in a state of change, and are intrinsically empty. There is no escaping shunyata. On an internal level we can experience our thoughts, emotions and self identity arise and fade away. The self is always in a state of disolving within the present, nothing remains! This is both a source of great internal conflict and a source of great strenght.
In return, the concept of shunyata can also be manipulated into a grand rationalization and a vehicle for escapism and irresponsibility. It is easy to let go of our missconduct and ignorance by simply sweeping it aside, after all it is empty anyway, right? All we need to do is let go of it and move on. AA addresses this issue in its serenity prayer when it states,"... grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference". The serenity prayer addresses both the impermanence and emptiness of all things, as well as our responsibility to "change the things [we] can... "Moreover, A.A. puts into action the serenity prayer via the 12 steps, by encouraging those in recovery to make a list of those who [we] harmed, followed by making ammends to those people. This is not dissimilar to Buddhism's "Eightfold path". These steps are for addicts, right? I perceive these steps are valid for us all, and this is validated by the fact these steps can also be found in almost all religions. Replace alcohol/drugs with our shotcomings and attachments, and the process is valid for all of humanity, minus saints and Buddhas 😉 Moreover, these steps are an ongoing process, they are not a one time thing. Keeping an ongoing inventory of our thoughts and actions is an essential part of our practice.
Shunyata can also lead to zen sickness, or attachment and escape within emptiness. It is important to watch that we are not using "shunyata" or Zen Practice as a tool to obsolve our guilt or dissmiss our missconduct. We may think, "It happened, there is nothing I can do about it. It really does not matter anyway. The rest is on them". Emptiness held in this way is nothing more than ignorance. We must let go of our "ideas" of what emptiness is and liberate our hearts and minds by taking responsibility for our actions. After doing what we can to make ammends, then we can let go and desolve within shunyata.
... See MoreSee Less

Emptiness, or Shunyata is a key concept within Buddhism. All is empty, nothing remains, or in AA they say This too shall pass. You can see and experience shunyata opperating within the world around you. The flowers bloom in spring, the mountain turns green and the forrest comes alive. In winter, the flowers leave no trace, the mountain turns brown, and the forrest goes still. All phenomena are always in a state of change, and are intrinsically empty.  There is no escaping shunyata. On an internal level we can experience our thoughts, emotions and self identity arise and fade away. The self is always in a state of disolving within the present, nothing remains! This is both a source of great internal conflict and a source of great strenght. 
In return, the concept of shunyata can also be manipulated into a grand rationalization and a vehicle for escapism and irresponsibility. It is easy to let go of our missconduct and ignorance by simply sweeping it aside, after all it is empty anyway, right? All we need to do is let go of it and move on. AA addresses this issue in its serenity prayer when it states,... grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference. The serenity prayer addresses both the impermanence and emptiness of all things, as well as our responsibility to change the things [we] can... Moreover, A.A. puts into action the serenity prayer via the 12 steps, by encouraging those in recovery to make a list of those who [we] harmed, followed by making ammends to those people. This is not dissimilar to Buddhisms Eightfold path. These steps are for addicts, right? I perceive these steps are valid for us all, and this is validated by the fact these steps can also be found in almost all religions. Replace alcohol/drugs with our shotcomings and attachments, and the process is valid for all of humanity, minus saints and Buddhas ;) Moreover, these steps are an ongoing process, they are not a one time thing. Keeping an ongoing inventory of our thoughts and actions is an essential part of our practice.
Shunyata can also lead to zen sickness, or attachment and escape within emptiness. It is important to watch that we are not using shunyata or Zen Practice as a tool to obsolve our guilt or dissmiss our missconduct. We may think, It happened, there is nothing I can do about it. It really does not matter anyway. The rest is on them. Emptiness held in this way is nothing more than ignorance. We must let go of our ideas of what emptiness is and liberate our hearts and minds by taking responsibility for our actions. After doing what we can to make ammends, then we can let go and desolve within shunyata.

 

Comment on Facebook

Very helpful

"Know that you are the light!"
Can you see this? Can you feel this? Can you experience this? You are that which you seek, and what you seek is beyond "you". Let go, and free fall into each moment, becoming the warm light and cool breeze which rolls across your face. It is within this free fall that we dissolve and illuminate our true nature, infinite universal light!
... See MoreSee Less

Know that you are the light! 
Can you see this? Can you feel this? Can you experience this? You are that which you seek, and what you seek is beyond you. Let go, and  free fall into each moment, becoming the warm light and cool breeze which rolls across your face. It is within this free fall that we dissolve and illuminate our true nature, infinite universal light!

4 weeks ago

Blue Mountain Zendo  Koryu-ji

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We talk about the awakened mind being "ordinary". Many hear this and immediately perceive the meaning as "I am a Buddha and there is nothing to be done. Things are perfect as they are." To such a statement Eido Roshi would say “Not incorrect”, which was a nice way of saying in this situation, the statement had “missed it”. Similar to the misunderstanding of what “ordinary” mind points too, is the statement that “we are already Buddha”. Not incorrect, however, for our day to day lives, it is better said that “we are all intrinsically Buddha”. The word “intrinsically” is a key point here and ensures we understand that this truth requires effort and realization. The statement cuts through our self-doubt and reassures us that we are capable of being something exquisitely beautiful and loving. Our Buddha Nature is our purest state of being and has many names, in many different traditions. The names don't matter, the realization of these designations does. My Christian brothers and sisters may call this state "Christ Consciousness" while others may call it "union with Brahma". So are we already awakened and already Buddha? Are things already perfect therefore there is no need to aspire towards realization? I hope you explore that question in your day to day life, and find your own Dharma. ... See MoreSee Less

We talk about the awakened mind being ordinary. Many hear this and immediately perceive the meaning as I am a Buddha and there is nothing to be done. Things are perfect as they are. To such a statement Eido Roshi would say “Not incorrect”, which was a nice way of saying in this situation, the statement had “missed it”. Similar to the misunderstanding of what “ordinary” mind points too, is the statement that “we are already Buddha”. Not incorrect, however, for our day to day lives, it is better said that “we are all intrinsically Buddha”. The word “intrinsically” is a key point here and ensures we understand that this truth requires effort and realization. The statement cuts through our self-doubt and reassures us that we are capable of being something exquisitely beautiful and loving. Our Buddha Nature is our purest state of being and has many names, in many different traditions. The names dont matter, the realization of these designations does. My Christian brothers and sisters may call this state Christ Consciousness while others may call it union with Brahma. So are we already awakened and already Buddha? Are things already perfect therefore there is no need to aspire towards realization? I hope you explore that question in your day to day life, and find your own Dharma.
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Calendar

Jul
23
Tue
Zazenkai at Blue mountain Zendo Koryuji @ Blue Mountain Zendo
Jul 23 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Blue Mountain Zendo is celebrating its new move to the Poconos in Northeastern Pennsylvania with a focused on change and creating new pathways. Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.
During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round. The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk followed by the close of the service.

Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Jul 23 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Jul
30
Tue
Zazenkai at Blue mountain Zendo Koryuji @ Blue Mountain Zendo
Jul 30 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Blue Mountain Zendo is celebrating its new move to the Poconos in Northeastern Pennsylvania with a focused on change and creating new pathways. Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.
During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round. The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk followed by the close of the service.

Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Jul 30 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Aug
6
Tue
Zazenkai at Blue mountain Zendo Koryuji @ Blue Mountain Zendo
Aug 6 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Blue Mountain Zendo is celebrating its new move to the Poconos in Northeastern Pennsylvania with a focused on change and creating new pathways. Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.
During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round. The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk followed by the close of the service.

Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Aug 6 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Aug
13
Tue
Zazenkai at Blue mountain Zendo Koryuji @ Blue Mountain Zendo
Aug 13 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Blue Mountain Zendo is celebrating its new move to the Poconos in Northeastern Pennsylvania with a focused on change and creating new pathways. Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.
During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round. The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk followed by the close of the service.

Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Aug 13 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Aug
20
Tue
Zazenkai at Blue mountain Zendo Koryuji @ Blue Mountain Zendo
Aug 20 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Blue Mountain Zendo is celebrating its new move to the Poconos in Northeastern Pennsylvania with a focused on change and creating new pathways. Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.
During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round. The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk followed by the close of the service.

Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Aug 20 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

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Please speak out about the abuse of the Rohingya people.

Please speak out about the abuse of the Rohingya people.

www.change.org/p/to-aung-san-suu-kyi-an-immediate-stop-to-the-ethnic-cleansing-of-rohingya ...
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Fall Session October 20-24 2017

Fall Session October 20-24 2017

Weekend Sesshin are a great opportunity to experience Zen Monastic ...
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Zen

Bodhidharma’s Definition Of Zen Practice

“A special transmission outside the scriptures; Not depending upon words and letters; Directly pointing at the mind-heart of man; Seeing into one’s nature and attaining Buddhahood.”

Zen Practice is the skin, bone and marrow of the Buddha’s teaching. It cuts through the vines and briars which have long entangled us.

As Bodhidharma pointed out, Zen is not based on intellectual pursuits, and is unattainable to those who attempt to understand it via mere scholarly persuits. However, some will push forward with tenacity and perseverance, and these students will realize the wondrous joy of the Dharma. Zen Practice is for those who must know the truth, and are willing to push through the many obstacles that are the catalysts to awakening.

Zazenkai

Zazenkai (meditation service) provides an opportunity for a student to intensify and deepen their practice through the experience of longer periods of uninterrupted zazen and walking meditation.

Throughout zazenkai we use the exact techniques that are followed  in a Rinzai Zen Monastery. During zazenkai we practice zazen (seated meditation), chanting , walking meditation (kin-hin), silence, jihatsu (formal eating), dokusan (private meeting w/teacher) and to conclude, a Dharma Talk (sermon) is given by Joriki Dat Baker.

After closing, tea and fellowship are offered in the lounge.

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