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We never know what each day may bring. We hear the bell and begin our day. Some mornings are rough and we drag ourselves out of bed. Other days we are awake before the bell rings and excited to begin our day. No matter how our day begins, we press on.
The bad days cause suffering and anxiety, we grasp at change, we fight each moment attempting to force change. In doing this, we water the seeds of our own discontent and suffering. Anger soon follows which triggers the bloom of samara. Our world now is small, disconnected and dark, a "bad day".
We all can remember making that infamous statement, "I had a bad day, I just want it over!" Our world becomes narrow and small. There is no room for others and nothing to give. Our knees buckle by the weight, and we struggle to confront the world before us.
Sometimes it is feels impossible to face the world before us. It becomes too daunting of a task. Every step feels odd, unsure and clumsy. In contrast, instead of struggling, what would it be like to open moment to moment?
To open to the ocean of now, and relinquish control as you ebb and flow with the waves of phenomena. Desolving fully and laying down the burden.
One of the fruits of zen practice is the ability to see the beauty and perfection that stands before us, as it is. Limitless and open, the universe is not entangled by preference. It manifests in accord with karma, not self interest. Folding into the universe, desolving within the "way" - what is it to say, "Everyday is a good day"? How do we respond to those bad days as they wash over us? How do we find humor and freedom within adversity. These questions I will leave you to explore. I hope today is a good day for you all.
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We never know what each day may bring. We hear the bell and begin our day. Some mornings are rough and we drag ourselves out of bed. Other days we are awake before the bell rings and excited to begin our day. No matter how our day begins, we press on.
The bad days cause suffering and anxiety, we grasp at change, we fight each moment attempting to force change. In doing this, we water the seeds of our own discontent and suffering. Anger soon follows which triggers the bloom of samara. Our world now is small, disconnected and dark, a bad day.
We all can remember making that infamous statement, I had a bad day, I just want it over! Our world becomes narrow and small. There is no room for others and nothing to give. Our knees buckle by the weight, and we struggle to confront the world before us.
Sometimes it is feels impossible to face the world before us. It becomes too daunting of a task. Every step feels odd, unsure and clumsy. In contrast, instead of struggling, what would it be like to open moment to moment? 
To open to the ocean of now, and relinquish control as you ebb and flow with the waves of phenomena. Desolving fully and laying down the burden.
One of the fruits of zen practice is the ability to see the beauty and perfection that stands before us, as it is. Limitless and open, the universe is not entangled by preference. It manifests in accord with karma, not self interest. Folding into the universe, desolving within the way - what is it to say, Everyday is a good day? How do we respond to those bad days as they wash over us? How do we find humor and freedom within adversity. These questions I will leave you to explore. I hope today is a good day for you all.

Durring this time of social distancing, Blue Mountain Zendo would like to offer men and women of all backgrounds the opportunity to Skype with Joriki, Osho (Zen Monk). Interested persons are not required to be temple members or Buddhist and are welcome to discuss any topic of their choosing, including just talking and being present. Please message the temple to schedule a meeting time. ... See MoreSee Less

Durring this time of social distancing, Blue Mountain Zendo would like to offer men and women of all backgrounds the opportunity to Skype with Joriki, Osho (Zen Monk). Interested persons are not required to be temple members or Buddhist and are welcome to discuss any topic of their choosing, including just talking and being present. Please message the temple to schedule a meeting time.

Just today, I received notice that all non-essential buiessneess have been told to close by midnight tonight. In light of this, I must comply and cancel zazenkai for Tuesday. We will reopen as soon as possible. Please take this time to care for yourself and those around you.

Blessings
... See MoreSee Less

Just today, I received notice that all non-essential buiessneess have been told to close by midnight tonight. In light of this, I must comply and cancel zazenkai for Tuesday. We will reopen as soon as possible. Please take this time to care for yourself and those around you.

                  Blessings

Joshin is now training once again. It is nice to have him back. ... See MoreSee Less

Joshin is now training once again. It is nice to have him back.

 

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https://youtu.be/P6WjhzzEHmE

March 10 2020 (6:30-8:00pm) Sermon/Teisho Mumonkan Case 38 "A buffalo passes through a window". Beginners welcomed... ... See MoreSee Less

March 10 2020 (6:30-8:00pm) Sermon/Teisho Mumonkan Case 38 A buffalo passes through a window. Beginners welcomed...

 

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We pulled over and he got up and walked right out in front for us. South Dakota 2 summers ago

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Calendar

Apr
14
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Apr 14 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Apr
21
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Apr 21 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Apr
28
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Apr 28 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

May
5
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
May 5 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

May
12
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
May 12 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

May
19
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
May 19 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

May
26
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
May 26 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Jun
2
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Jun 2 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Jun
9
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Jun 9 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Jun
16
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Jun 16 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

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Zen

Bodhidharma’s Definition Of Zen Practice

“A special transmission outside the scriptures; Not depending upon words and letters; Directly pointing at the mind-heart of man; Seeing into one’s nature and attaining Buddhahood.”

Zen Practice is the skin, bone and marrow of the Buddha’s teaching. It cuts through the vines and briars which have long entangled us.

As Bodhidharma pointed out, Zen is not based on intellectual pursuits, and is unattainable to those who attempt to understand it via mere scholarly persuits. However, some will push forward with tenacity and perseverance, and these students will realize the wondrous joy of the Dharma. Zen Practice is for those who must know the truth, and are willing to push through the many obstacles that are the catalysts to awakening.

Zazenkai

Zazenkai (meditation service) provides an opportunity for a student to intensify and deepen their practice through the experience of longer periods of uninterrupted zazen and walking meditation.

Throughout zazenkai we use the exact techniques that are followed  in a Rinzai Zen Monastery. During zazenkai we practice zazen (seated meditation), chanting , walking meditation (kin-hin), silence, jihatsu (formal eating), dokusan (private meeting w/teacher) and to conclude, a Dharma Talk (sermon) is given by Joriki Dat Baker.

After closing, tea and fellowship are offered in the lounge.

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