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Good news, Blue Mountain Zendo will be offering Zazenkai once again at our Bethlehem location starting on June 23 2020 from 6:30-8:00pm. ... See MoreSee Less

Good news, Blue Mountain Zendo will be offering Zazenkai once again at our Bethlehem location starting on June 23 2020 from 6:30-8:00pm.

On June 21 2020 Blue Mountain Zendo (Pocono Temple Only) will be offering Zazenkai from 3:00-5:30pm. The public zendo in Bethlehem will remain closed until the Lehigh Valley turns green and the board decides it is safe to do so. Please contact the zendo if you plan on attending.

(Masks are required)
... See MoreSee Less

On June 21 2020 Blue Mountain Zendo (Pocono Temple Only) will be offering Zazenkai from 3:00-5:30pm. The public zendo in Bethlehem will remain closed until the Lehigh Valley turns green and the board decides it is safe to do so. Please contact the zendo if you plan on attending.

(Masks are required)

On June 07 2020 Blue Mountain Zendo (Pocono Temple Only) will be offering Zazenkai at 3:00pm. The public zendo in Bethlehem will remain closed until the Lehigh Valley turns green and the board decides it is safe to do so. Please contact the zendo if you plan on attending.

(Masks are required)
... See MoreSee Less

On June 07 2020 Blue Mountain Zendo (Pocono Temple Only) will be offering Zazenkai at 3:00pm. The public zendo in Bethlehem will remain closed until the Lehigh Valley turns green and the board decides it is safe to do so. Please contact the zendo if you plan on attending.

(Masks are required)

On May 13 2020 Russel Brown passed away, and he will be missed. Russel's life was difficult, yet he maintained an open heart. Russell was moved to help incarcerated men and women overcome the barriers which lead many to recidivism. Over the past year, Russell was organizing a support system to bring his vision into a concrete reality. Russel Brown was ordained posthumously and given the dharma name Daiken (Great Courage).

White Ashes

Now, if we look realistically at the nature of human life, we see that it is fleeting and unpredictable, illusive almost. Birth, life and death pass by in the twinkling of an eye. Thus we never hear of the human body lasting for ten thousand years.

And who today can keep the body young and healthy for even one hundred years? Yes, how quickly our lives slip away. Whether I am the first or someone else, whether today or tomorrow, our lives on earth do indeed one day come to an end. Life seems to vanish unseen like ground water, or to evaporate like the morning dew on the summer lawn.

Thus our bodies may be radiant with health in the morning, but by evening they may be white ashes. If the right causes and conditions prevail, our two eyes are closed forever, our breathing ceases and our bodies lose the glow of life. Our relatives in great numbers and with great wealth can assemble, but they are powerless to change our situation. Even the rites and rituals of grief and mourning change nothing. All we can do is prepare the body for cremation; all that is left is white ashes.

In view of these facts, does it not make sense to focus on the things we can change? We cannot control the passing away of both young and old alike, but each of us can take refuge in the [Buddha, Dharma and Sangha]...

With friendly reverence, I remain,

Rennyo (1414-1499)
... See MoreSee Less

On May 13 2020 Russel Brown passed away, and he will be missed. Russels life was difficult, yet he maintained an open heart. Russell was moved to help incarcerated men and women overcome the barriers which lead many to recidivism. Over the past year, Russell was organizing a support system to bring his vision into a concrete reality. Russel Brown was ordained posthumously and given the dharma name Daiken (Great Courage).

                         White Ashes 

Now, if we look realistically at the nature of human life, we see that it is fleeting and unpredictable, illusive almost. Birth, life and death pass by in the twinkling of an eye. Thus we never hear of the human body lasting for ten thousand years.

And who today can keep the body young and healthy for even one hundred years? Yes, how quickly our lives slip away. Whether I am the first or someone else, whether today or tomorrow, our lives on earth do indeed one day come to an end. Life seems to vanish unseen like ground water, or to evaporate like the morning dew on the summer lawn.

Thus our bodies may be radiant with health in the morning, but by evening they may be white ashes. If the right causes and conditions prevail, our two eyes are closed forever, our breathing ceases and our bodies lose the glow of life. Our relatives in great numbers and with great wealth can assemble, but they are powerless to change our situation. Even the rites and rituals of grief and mourning change nothing. All we can do is prepare the body for cremation; all that is left is white ashes.

In view of these facts, does it not make sense to focus on the things we can change? We cannot control the passing away of both young and old alike, but each of us can take refuge in the [Buddha, Dharma and Sangha]...

With friendly reverence, I remain,

Rennyo (1414-1499)

 

Comment on Facebook

Thank you so much for the beautiful words for my husband. He had so many things he was trying to accomplish, he was needed elsewhere. Till we meet again.

It comes bubbling up. With time and stillness many of the subtle issues we confront in our daily lives reveal themselves to us. Like a pressure cooker that must must let off some steam, so must we. Simmering conflict is always just underneath the surface. No need to worry, thks is okay and you are okay. Actually this is a great time for us to work on these issues whether they are personal or part of a relationship.
Just like that new paint, yard work or spring cleaning, we can all add these troubling issues to our "to-do" list. We can utilize this time to not just spruce up our living space but, to spruce up the quality of our "living". We can plant the seeds of change and nurture them daily, reaping the beauty they create as they bloom.
Lets get started. Try sitting alone and journal some of the uncomfortable feelings and thoughts which have visited you. Now you can see them clearly before you. Ponder them in stillness and decide which need to be addressed first. After choosing one, take the time needed to really understand the issue. You can once again journal it by writing down any details or emotions you may encounter while pondering it. Whether your project includes just you or a partner, create a time that you can dedicate to yourself/one another. Discuss what you have written down with each other and allow each other some time to process what you have shared. When meeting again, take turns speaking. Agree to a clear border of sharing, no interrupting, no debating, and no arguing. Open yourself to what is being said, don't work out your disagreements or counter points. Lets go of your reactions and just listen with heart and mind. Ponder how you can relate, not how you see things differently. Work together and encourage each other to be honest. When clarity is realized, create concrete steps that you both can agree upon; write them down. Sometimes a task looks to big but, breaking it down makes it a little more approachable. Place your "steps" in a visable but, private area to remind you of the work at hand.
Agree upon an outcome. Clarify what each of you hope for, and create a co-vision, something you both believe would strengthen your relationship and bring you both happiness. Having a goal at hand creates something to work towards, something concrete and tangible. Most of all, be patient and loving. Try to remember everyone is doing their best, and noone is perfect. We all have our own personal quirks and deficits. It is only natural that these will arise and be more apparent to one another under these circumstances. With this being said, lets take this tragic situation and try to create something better, not just for us but, other family and friends. A better "us". Split your time between some "house" maintenance and some "home" maintenance. As they say, "Home is where the heart is", so take care of each other, and make your home a place of refuge.
... See MoreSee Less

It comes bubbling up. With time and stillness many of the subtle issues we confront in our daily lives reveal themselves to us. Like a pressure cooker that must must let off some steam, so must we. Simmering conflict is always just underneath the surface. No need to worry, thks is okay and you are okay. Actually this is a great time for us to work on these issues whether they are personal or part of a relationship.
Just like that new paint, yard work or spring cleaning, we can all add these troubling issues to our to-do list. We can utilize this time to not just spruce up our living space but, to spruce up the quality of our living. We can plant the seeds of change and nurture them daily, reaping the beauty they create as they bloom. 
Lets get started. Try sitting alone and journal some of the uncomfortable feelings and thoughts which have visited you. Now you can see them clearly before you. Ponder them in stillness and decide which need to be addressed first. After choosing one, take the time needed to really understand the issue. You can once again journal it by writing down any  details or emotions you may encounter while pondering it. Whether your project includes just you or a partner, create a time that you can dedicate to yourself/one another. Discuss what you have written down with each other and allow each other some time to process what you have shared. When meeting again, take turns speaking. Agree to a clear border of sharing, no interrupting, no debating, and no arguing. Open yourself to what is being said, dont work out your disagreements or counter points. Lets go of your reactions and just listen with heart and mind. Ponder how you can relate, not how you see things differently. Work together and encourage each other to be honest. When clarity is realized, create concrete steps that you both can agree upon; write them down. Sometimes a task looks to big but, breaking it down makes it a little more approachable. Place your steps in a visable but, private area to remind you of the work at hand.
Agree upon an outcome. Clarify what each of you hope for, and create a co-vision, something you both believe would strengthen your relationship and bring you both happiness. Having a goal at hand creates something to work towards, something concrete and tangible. Most of all, be patient and loving. Try to remember everyone is doing their best, and noone is perfect. We all have our own personal quirks and deficits. It is only natural that these will arise and be more apparent to one another under these circumstances. With this being said, lets take this tragic situation and try to create something better,  not just for us but, other family and friends. A better us. Split your time between some house maintenance and some home maintenance. As they say, Home is where the heart is, so take care of each other, and make your home a place of refuge.
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Calendar

Jul
14
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Jul 14 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Jul
21
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Jul 21 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Jul
28
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Jul 28 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Aug
4
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Aug 4 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Aug
11
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Aug 11 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Aug
18
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Aug 18 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Aug
25
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Aug 25 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Sep
1
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Sep 1 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Sep
8
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Sep 8 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

Sep
15
Tue
Zen Meditation – Friends Meeting House @ Blue Mountain Zendo@Quaker Meeting House
Sep 15 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 

Students who are new to Zen Practice should arrive fifteen minutes early for meditation instructions. Blue Mountain Zendo does offer cushion sets; however, it is a good idea to obtain a personal set if possible, or contact the zendo to let them know you will need a set to use. Having your own set will allow you the opportunity to sit both with the sangha (group) as well as alone when at home or work, however, please ask for the appropriate color and size before ordering. Also to note, if you cannot sit on the floor due to a medical condition, chairs are available. If done correctly, sitting in a chair is no different than sitting on the floor.
An offering  is traditional for those visiting for the first time. This offering is symbolic of the “open” and “giving” nature of the new student and his/her recognition of the value of the teachings.

During Zazenkai (Extended Zen Service) the han (wooden block) is struck for the first time to start the beginning of the service. The ino then announces the first chant and the service begins. We chant in both Japanese, Pali and English to show respect to Zen’s roots and lineage. After the last chant, kinhin or walking meditation begins which will be repeated at various times during the service. The bell is struck and the sangha sits down to begin zazen (seated meditation) practice. During Zazen we become, and remain still throughout the round while watching our breath or working on our Koan. Our eyes become half closed and focused downward to the floor in front of us to avoid distractions. The bell is struck (dink) after 25 minutes and to allow new students the option to stand up and face the wall or adjust their posture. The bell is struck once again after 10 minutes, informing those who are standing to please be seated. The final bell struck is at the 40 minute mark to signal the cessation of the sitting round.The sangha then does walking meditation or Kin-hin which will last for fifteen minutes. When kinhin is completed, the sangha once again is seated.
To conclude, Rev. Joriki Ryuun Baker, Osho may offer a Dharma Talk and the service is closed with chanting.

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Zen

Bodhidharma’s Definition Of Zen Practice

“A special transmission outside the scriptures; Not depending upon words and letters; Directly pointing at the mind-heart of man; Seeing into one’s nature and attaining Buddhahood.”

Zen Practice is the skin, bone and marrow of the Buddha’s teaching. It cuts through the vines and briars which have long entangled us.

As Bodhidharma pointed out, Zen is not based on intellectual pursuits, and is unattainable to those who attempt to understand it via mere scholarly persuits. However, some will push forward with tenacity and perseverance, and these students will realize the wondrous joy of the Dharma. Zen Practice is for those who must know the truth, and are willing to push through the many obstacles that are the catalysts to awakening.

Zazenkai

Zazenkai (meditation service) provides an opportunity for a student to intensify and deepen their practice through the experience of longer periods of uninterrupted zazen and walking meditation.

Throughout zazenkai we use the exact techniques that are followed  in a Rinzai Zen Monastery. During zazenkai we practice zazen (seated meditation), chanting , walking meditation (kin-hin), silence, jihatsu (formal eating), dokusan (private meeting w/teacher) and to conclude, a Dharma Talk (sermon) is given by Joriki Dat Baker.

After closing, tea and fellowship are offered in the lounge.

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